News World Trump administration refrains from endorsing U.S. Senate measure on Armenian Genocide

Trump administration refrains from endorsing U.S. Senate measure on Armenian Genocide

The Trump administration on Tuesday refrained from endorsing a resolution passed by the U.S. Senate recognizing as a genocide the mass killings of Armenians a century ago, saying it continued to see them as “mass atrocities.”

The position taken appears aimed at assuaging Turkey, which was infuriated by the passage of the measure last week. The measure is non-binding but asserts that it is U.S. policy to commemorate as genocide the killing of 1.5 million Armenians by the Ottoman Empire from 1915 to 1923.

In response, Turkey summoned the U.S. Ambassador to Ankara to convey its dismay. The NATO allies had already been at loggerheads over some issues, ranging from Turkey‘s purchase of a Russian missile defense system to policy on the war in Syria.

U.S. President Donald Trump has been criticized by U.S. lawmakers, including his fellow Republicans, for shielding Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan, with whom he enjoys a special rapport, from U.S. sanctions over the weapons purchase.

“The position of the Administration has not changed,” State Department spokeswoman Morgan Ortagus said in a statement on the subject of Armenia. “Our views are reflected in the President’s definitive statement on this issue from last April.”

On the April 24 Armenian Genocide Remembrance Day, Trump in a statement commemorated the killings, describing them as “mass atrocities” as opposed to a genocide.

“Beginning in 1915, one and a half million Armenians were deported, massacred, or marched to their deaths in the final years of the Ottoman Empire,” he said.

Turkey accepts that many Armenians living in the Ottoman Empire were killed in clashes with Ottoman forces during World War One, but contests the figures and denies that the killings were systematically orchestrated and constitute a genocide.

For decades, measures recognizing the Armenian genocide have stalled in the U.S. Congress, stymied by concerns about relations with Turkey and intense lobbying by Ankara. The passing of the resolution highlights the bipartisan anger of the U.S. Congress towards Ankara over its recent actions.

(Reuters)

Top Stories

166 new cases of COVID-19 on Friday

The Health Ministry announced 166 new COVID-19 cases on 30 October, out of 3,672 laboratory tests, taking confirmed infections to 4,217. The break-down of new...

Samos island: two children dead from collapse of wall; six dead in Turkey’s Izmir area

Two children died when a wall fell on them on the island of Samos on Thursday, the first reported Greek casualties of an earthquake...

Protest outside Polish Embassy organized Saturday 15.30

A protest outside the Polish Embassy is being organized for tomorrow, Saturday at 15.30 in solidarity to the women in Poland since the government...

Seismologists warn of strong aftershocks to follow Samos earthquake

Seismologists warned that people should expect a series of strong aftershocks to follow the 6.7 Richter earthquake that hit the island of Samos and...

33-year-old arrested for stealing dogs

A 33-year-old man from Larnaca has been arrested in connection with a case of stealing animals. According to the police an arrest warrant was pending...

Taste

Squash soup

Ingredients: 1 kg pumpkin, cut into small cubes, approximately 5 cups 2 medium (400g) sweet potatoes, cut into cubes, approximately 2 ½ cups 1 chopped leek, only...

Mezedes

No visit to Cyprus is complete without enjoying the traditional meal of many small dishes known as ‘meze’. This large feast, which has been a...

Prawns with fried cheese, barley shaped pasta

Put the barley shaped pasta into a small pan with salted water, bring to a boil and when tender, drain. Peal the prawns leaving...

Salmon and shrimp sheftalies

Mix all ingredients for tabbouli in a bowl and keep to one side so flavours can combine. Prepare the sheftalies: wash and soak the casing...