News World New U.S. rule could disqualify half of visa applicants

New U.S. rule could disqualify half of visa applicants

U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration unveiled a new rule on Monday that could deny permanent residency to hundreds of thousands of people for being too poor.

The long-anticipated rule, pushed by Trump’s leading anti-immigration aide Stephen Miller, takes effect in mid-October and would reject applicants for temporary or permanent visas for failing to meet income standards or for receiving public assistance such as welfare, food stamps, public housing or Medicaid.

Such a change would ensure that immigrants “are self-sufficient,” in that they “do not depend on public resources to meet their needs, but rather rely on their own capabilities, as well as the resources of family members, sponsors, and private organisations,” a notice published in the Federal Register said.

This could be the most drastic of all the Trump administration’s anti-immigration policies, experts have said. Advocates for immigrants have criticised the plan as an effort to cut legal immigration without going through Congress to change U.S. law.

Under the new rules, more than half of all family-based green card applicants would be denied, according to the Migration Policy Institute, a research organisation. Some 800,000 green cards were granted in 2016.

The new rule is derived from the Immigration Act of 1882, which allows the U.S. government to deny a visa to anyone likely to become a “public charge.” Immigration officers in recent years have defined visa applicants as a public charge if they are likely to become primarily dependent on government assistance.

Most nonresident immigrants are ineligible for the major aid programmes until they get green cards, but the new rule published by the Department of Homeland Security expands the definition of a public charge that stands to disqualify more people.

Applicants will now need to show higher levels of income to get a visa, and the rule greatly expands the list of government benefits that would disqualify them from obtaining U.S. residency.

(Reuters)

Top Stories

Fifteen centuries, two faiths and a contested fate for Hagia Sophia

A Turkish court on Friday annulled a 1934 government decree that had turned Istanbul's Hagia Sophia into a museum, opening the way for the sixth-century building to...

Yellow alert for extreme high temperatures

The Department of Meteorology issued on Friday a yellow alert for extremely high temperatures on Saturday. The alert is in force from 11 am until...

Three new Covid-19 cases, one a football player who arrived from Serbia

Three more people have tested positive for coronavirus after 1247 tests, bringing the total to 1013, the Health Ministry said on Friday. The two positive...

New Energy Minister Natasa Pilides sworn in

New Minister of Energy, Commerce and Industry of Cyprus Natasa Pilides assumed duties on Friday, with the promise to work hard to continue the...

Turkish court paves way to turn Hagia Sophia into a mosque

A Turkish court annulled on Friday a 1934 government decree turning Istanbul's Hagia Sophia into a museum, paving the way for the building's conversion back into mosque...

Taste

Moungra

Moungra is a traditional Cypriot mezze which consists in cauliflower pickled in fermented bread dough and typically served as an appetizer or meze. It...

Cheesy Eggplant Rolls

Ingredients 4 Eggplants 2 tbsp olive oil 1 chopped onion, 2 grated carrots 1 garlic clove (sliced) ¾ of the cup finely chopped canned tomato, ½ ts sugar 1 ts oregano 2 tbsp...

Black eyed peas with chard (Louvia me laxana)

Ingredients: 2 cups black eyed peas small lemon (juice) + 1 tsp lemon zest 1 bunch Cypriot chards olive oil & lemon for serving salt & pepper Method: Step 1 Put the...

How to make triandafillo ice cream, by UK Cypriot chef Loulla Astin

  Just in time for the scorching heat, UK Cypriot chef Loulla Astin has shared her recipe for refreshing triantafillo ice cream -- or as...