News World Jo Johnson quits as minister over Theresa May's Brexit plan

Jo Johnson quits as minister over Theresa May’s Brexit plan

Jo Johnson has quit as transport minister and called for the public to have a fresh say on Brexit.

The MP, who is Boris Johnson’s brother but voted Remain in the referendum, said the deal being negotiated with the EU “will be a terrible mistake”.

Arguing Britain was “on the brink of the greatest crisis” since World War Two, he said what was on offer wasn’t “anything like what was promised”.

Downing Street thanked him for his work but ruled out another referendum.

Jo Johnson voted to remain in the EU in the 2016 referendum while his brother Boris, who quit as foreign secretary in July, was a leading Brexiteer.

His brother praised his decision, saying they were “united in dismay” at the PM’s handling of the negotiations.

Cabinet ministers have been invited this week to read the UK’s draft withdrawal deal with the EU. Theresa May has said the withdrawal deal is 95% done – but there is no agreement yet on how to guarantee no hard border in Northern Ireland.

On Friday the DUP, whose support Theresa May relies on for votes in the Commons, said they cannot support any deal which included the possibility that Northern Ireland would be treated differently from the rest of the UK.

Mr Johnson, the MP for Orpington in Kent, said the choice being finalised was either: an agreement which would leave the UK “economically weakened with no say in the EU rules it must follow”, or a “no-deal Brexit” which would “inflict untold damage on our nation”.

He described this as “a failure of British statecraft unseen since the Suez crisis” but said even a no-deal Brexit “may well be better than the never-ending purgatory” being put forward by the prime minister.

But in a warning to his brother and fellow Brexiteers, he added: “Inflicting such serious economic and political harm on the country will leave an indelible impression of incompetence in the minds of the public.”

The “democratic thing to do is to give the public the final say”, he argued.

(BBC)

Top Stories

Two dead as rare storm ‘Ianos’ hits central Greece – follow the cyclone’s progress live

Two people died as a rare storm, known as a Medicane (Mediterranean hurricane), pounded central Greece on Saturday, flooding streets and homes, authorities said. Storm...

Worldwide coronavirus cases cross 30.35 million, death toll at 947,400

More than 30.35 million people have been reported to be infected by the novel coronavirus globally and 947,400 have died, according to a Reuters...

New UK lockdown likely sooner rather than later

Britain is likely to need to reintroduce some national coronavirus lockdown measures sooner rather than later, a former senior government health advisor said on...

Greece’s President says upcoming visit to the island underlines the bonds that unite our countries

President of the Hellenic Republic Katerina Sakellaropoulou says that her forthcoming official visit to Cyprus on Monday, September 21, underlines the strong bonds that...

Man, 20, injured by shotgun

A 20-year-old man in Larnaca suffered shotgun wounds on is leg at 3 in the afternoon on Friday. The injured man was transferred to Larnaca...

Taste

Chicken with okra and bulgur wheat

Heat the oil in a pan and sauté the okra until golden. Remove the okra, lay out in an oven tray and sprinkle with...

Swordfish with aubergines

To toast the sesame seeds: place sesame seeds in a small non-stick frying pan over low heat and stir until you begin to smell...

Ravioli

Just a little before serving, heat the broth and add the ravioli. (If the ravioli is frozen you don’t have to defrost). Heat them...

Seafood kebab with avocado salad

Place the mussels, shrimps and salmon in a bowl together with tarragon and lemon zest. Season and cover, keeping in the fridge for 15...