News Local August's full moon tonight

August’s full moon tonight

Sky gazers are in for a treat tonight as August’s full moon — known also as the Sturgeon Moon lights up the sky.

According to the Old Farmer’s Almanac guide to astronomy and nature, August’s Full Moon is named after the sturgeon fish becoming ready to be caught.

Amy Nieskens, of the Old Farmer’s Almanac guide to nature, said: “August’s Full Moon is known as the Sturgeon Moon because Native American tribes knew that the sturgeon in the Great Lakes and in Lake Champlain were most readily caught during the Full Moon.”

London’s Royal Observatory Greenwich in London added: “North American fishing tribes called August’s Full Moon the Sturgeon Moon since the species appeared in number this month.

“It’s also been called the Green Corn Moon, the Grain Moon and the Red Moon for the reddish hue it often takes on in the summer haze.”

And though the annual Perseid meteor shower has peaked and the bright moon may drown many Perseids from view, there’s still a chance to catch a few shooting through the sky as the Earth passes through the path of  Comet Swift-Tuttle  from July 17 to August 26.

The best direction to look is wherever your sky is darkest, probably straight up. The shower is best observed from 11 pm or midnight onwards, when you may see up to 100 meteors per hour, the European Space Agency says on its website.

The Perseids are sand- to pea-sized bits of rocky debris that were ejected long ago by comet Swift-Tuttle. This comet is slowly disintegrating as it orbits the Sun. Over the centuries, its crumbly remains have spread along its orbit to form a stream of particles hundreds of millions of kilometres long.

Earth’s path around the Sun carries us through this comet debris every mid-August. The particles, called ‘meteoroids’, are travelling at 60 km per second with respect to Earth. When one of them hits the upper atmosphere, it creates a white-hot streak of superheated air. Occasional brighter ones survive for several seconds, leaving trails of glowing smoke and gas.

The Perseids are ideal for digital imaging. Attach your camera to a tripod, preferably with a wide angle lens and a high ISO (darkness) setting. Keep the shutter open for 10-15 seconds at a time (longer in a really dark place). With a bit of luck, you should capture one or more Perseids streaking across the photo!

Keep away from bright lights, let your eyes adapt to the darkness, and lie back and stare at the sky!

 

Top Stories

29 new Covid-19 cases in Cyprus

Another 29 people tested positive for coronavirus the Health Ministry said on Tuesday, up on yesterday’s levels (19). This brings the total number of confirmed...

20 Cypriot Covid-19 patients included in Avigan trials

Cyprus is among 20 countries worldwide that will receive the drug Avigan to treat hospitalised Covid-19 patients, the Health Ministry said on Tuesday. It said...

CBC calls on Αsset Management Companies to promote loan repayment suspensions

The Central Bank of Cyprus called on Credit Acquiring Companies (CACs) to promote moratorium on loan repayments, as part of the measures to alleviate...

4,289 Cypriots express interest for repatriation via connect2cy platform

A total of 4,289 Cypriot citizens have expressed until early on Tuesday afternoon, through the online platform connect2cy, their interest to be repatriated, 3,600...

New charts on Covid-19 in Cyprus

The Health Ministry has released new infographics on the spread of Covid-19 in Cyprus that look at the geographical distribution, age group and smoking...

Taste

Stuffed vine leaves without meat

(Dolmadakia gialantzi) Rinse the leaves and boil in salted water for approximately 10 minutes until soft. Drain and place in some cold water with ice...

Snails with tomato sauce

When the snails are ready, drain them. Fry the onions in the oil and once slightly brown, add the tomatoes. Stir until cooked well...

Sea bream with capers

Clean the sea bream well, add salt and pepper to them and brush them with olive oil. Mix the capers and parsley together as...

Halloumi bread

Sift the flour with the salt into a bowl and mix in the yeast and lemon rind. Make a well in the centre of...